Herb: Pennywort


Latin name: Umbilicus rupestris


Synonyms: Cotyledon umbilicus-veneris, Umbilicus pendulinus


Family: Crassulaceae (Stonecrop Family)



Medicinal use of Pennywort:

The leaves are mildly analgesic. The juice and extract of the plant have an old reputation for the treatment of epilepsy. The leaves are also made into a poultice and used in the treatment of piles, slight burns and scalds. A decoction of the leaves is considered to be cooling and diuretic and the juice taken inwardly is said to be excellent for treating inflammations of the liver and spleen.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Evergreen
Perennial

Height:
30 cm
(11 3/4 inch)

Flovering:
June to
August

Habitat of the herb:

Crevices of rocks and walls, especially in acid and damp conditions. Avoids alkaline soils.

Edible parts of Pennywort:

Leaves - raw or cooked. A very acceptable mild flavour in the winter and early spring, they can be used in quantity in salads at this time. The leaves become rather stronger-tasting in the summer and are not so pleasant then.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in early summer. Division in spring. Very easy, pant them straight out into their permanent positions. Leaf cuttings.

Cultivation of Pennywort:

Crevices of rocks and walls, especially in acid and damp conditions. Avoids alkaline soils.

Known hazards of Umbilicus rupestris:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.