Herb: Ajanhuiri


Latin name: Solanum ajanhuiri


Family: Solanaceae (Nightshade Family, Potato Family)



Edible parts of Ajanhuiri:

Root - cooked. The tubers have a high content of dry matter and are a good source of vitamin C. Most forms are bitter and are sweetened by being made into "chušo" (a method of freeze-drying the tubers). There are some forms with sweet and floury tubers.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial

Habitat of the herb:

Found in very cool windy sites in the Andes at elevations between 2800 - 4100 metres.

Propagation of Ajanhuiri:

Seed - sow early spring in a warm greenhouse. Prick out the seedlings into a fairly rich compost as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on fast. Plant them out after the last expected frosts. Division. Harvest the tubers in autumn after the top-growth has been cut back by frost. Store the tubers in a cool frost-free place overwinter and replant in April.

Cultivation of the herb:

Found in very cool windy sites in the Andes at elevations between 2800 - 4100 metres.

Medicinal use of Ajanhuiri:

None known

Known hazards of Solanum ajanhuiri:

Although no specific mention of toxicity has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where many if not all the members have poisonous leaves and sometimes also the unripe fruits.

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.