Herb: Bermuda Blue-Eyed Grass


Latin name: Sisyrinchium angustifolium


Synonyms: Sisyrinchium graminoides, Sisyrinchium montanum


Family: Iridaceae (Iris Family)



Medicinal use of Bermuda Blue-Eyed Grass:

The root is astringent. An infusion is used to treat diarrhoea in adults and children. The leaves are eaten as a cooked green to regulate the bowels. An infusion of the plant has been used to treat stomach complaints and stomach worms.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
40 cm
(1 foot)

Flovering:
July to
August

Habitat of the herb:

Sandy woods in Texas. Naturalised in Britain where it grows in marshy meadows and on lake shores.

Edible parts of Bermuda Blue-Eyed Grass:

Leaves - cooked. They are mixed with other greens.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a greenhouse in the autumn, though it can also be sown in the spring. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring, after the last expected frosts. Division in early spring.

Cultivation of Bermuda Blue-Eyed Grass:

Sandy woods in Texas. Naturalised in Britain where it grows in marshy meadows and on lake shores.

Known hazards of Sisyrinchium angustifolium:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.