Herb: Wild Clary


Latin name: Salvia verbenaca


Synonyms: Salvia clandestina, Salvia controversa, Salvia horminoides


Family: Labiatae



Medicinal use of Wild Clary:

The seed forms a thick mucilage when it is soaked for a few minutes in water. This is efficacious in removing small particles of dust from the eyes.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
60 cm
(2 feet)

Flovering:
June to
September

Habitat of the herb:

In Britain it is found wild in only one place on sand dunes at Vazon Bay in Guernsey. In Europe it is found in dry grassland, avoiding acid soils and shade.

Edible parts of Wild Clary:

Leaves - raw or cooked. They are most often used as a flavouring in cooked foods. They are aromatic. The young leaves can be eaten fried or candied. A herb tea is made from the leaves, it is said to improve the digestion. Flowers - raw. A flavouring in salads.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - sow March/April in a greenhouse. Germination usually takes place within 2 weeks. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in early summer. In areas where the plant is towards the limits of its hardiness, it is best to grow the plants on in a greenhouse for their first winter and plant them out in late spring of the following year. Division in spring.

Cultivation of Wild Clary:

In Britain it is found wild in only one place on sand dunes at Vazon Bay in Guernsey. In Europe it is found in dry grassland, avoiding acid soils and shade.

Known hazards of Salvia verbenaca:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.