Herb: Prairie Coneflower


Latin name: Ratibida columnifera


Synonyms: Lepachys columnaris, Ratibida columnaris


Family: Compositae



Medicinal use of Prairie Coneflower:

The leaves and stems are analgesic. An infusion is used to relieve the pain of headaches and to treat stomach aches and fevers. A decoction is used as a wash to relieve pain and to treat poison ivy rash. The decoction is also used as a wash to draw the poison out of a rattlesnakes bite.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
75 cm
(2 feet)

Flovering:
September

Habitat of the herb:

Dry plains, prairies and ravines. Sandy, silty, or rocky open ground in Texas.

Edible parts of Prairie Coneflower:

A pleasant tasting tea is made from the leaves and flower heads.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - we have no information for this species but suggest sowing the seed in a cold frame in early spring. Only just cover the seed and put the pot in a sunny position. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in early summer. Division in spring is possible but very difficult because the plant has a long taproot.

Cultivation of Prairie Coneflower:

Dry plains, prairies and ravines. Sandy, silty, or rocky open ground in Texas.

Known hazards of Ratibida columnifera:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.