Herb: Herb Paris


Latin name: Paris polyphylla


Synonyms: Daiswa polyphylla


Family: Trilliaceae



Medicinal use of Herb Paris:

The roots are analgesic, antiphlogistic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, antitussive, depurative, febrifuge and narcotic. They posses anthelmintic properties. A decoction of the roots is used in the treatment of poisonous snake bites, boils and ulcers, diphtheria and epidemic Japanese B encephalitis. A paste of the roots is used as a poultice to treat cuts and wounds. The juice of the roots has been used as an anthelmintic. The roots have shown antibacterial action against Bacillus dysenteriae, B. typhi, B. paratyphi, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, haemolytic streptococci, Meningococci etc. The whole plant is febrifuge.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
100 cm
(3 1/4 foot)

Flovering:
July to
August

Habitat of the herb:

Broad-leaved and mixed woodlands to 3000 metres in the Himalayas. Forests, bamboo forests, thickets, grassy or rocky slopes and streamsides, 100 - 3500 metres in western China.

Edible parts of Herb Paris:

Seed. A sweet flavour, but mawkish.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in late summer in light shade in a greenhouse. Sow stored seed in a greenhouse as soon as it is received. The seed is very slow to germinate. It produces a primary root about 7 months after sowing, this pulls the seed deeper into the soil. Leaves are produced about 4 months later. Sow the seed thinly in fairly deep pots so that the seedlings can be grown on for their first two years without disturbance. Once they have germinated, give them a regular weak liquid feed to ensure that they do not suffer from nutrient deficiency. Once the plants are dormant at the end of their second year of growth, divide them up and put one plant in each pot. Grow them on for at least another year in a shady part of the greenhouse before planting them out into their permanent positions. Division.

Cultivation of Herb Paris:

Broad-leaved and mixed woodlands to 3000 metres in the Himalayas. Forests, bamboo forests, thickets, grassy or rocky slopes and streamsides, 100 - 3500 metres in western China.

Known hazards of Paris polyphylla:

Poisonous.

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.