Herb: Bigleaf Magnolia


Latin name: Magnolia macrophylla


Family: Magnoliaceae (Magnolia Family)



Medicinal use of Bigleaf Magnolia:

An infusion of the bark has been used in the treatment of stomach aches or cramps. A hot infusion of the bark has been snuffed for treating sinus problems and has been held in the mouth for treating toothache.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Deciduous
Tree

Height:
10 m
(33 feet)

Flovering:
June


Scent:
Scented
Tree

Habitat of the herb:

Usually growing in isolated groups of a few individuals in sheltered deep rich woods, often in ravines and river valleys.

Other uses of Bigleaf Magnolia:

Wood - soft, light, not strong, close-grained. Used for flooring, cabinet making etc. The wood is hard but weak according to another reports, which say that it is not used commercially. The wood weighs 33lb per cubic foot.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed must be kept cold over the winter and should be sown in late winter in a cold frame. The seed usually germinates in the spring but it can take 18 months. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse for at least their first winter. They can be planted out into their permanent positions when they are more than 15cm tall, though should be well mulched and given some protection from winter cold for their first winter or two outdoors. Layering in early spring.

Cultivation of Bigleaf Magnolia:

Usually growing in isolated groups of a few individuals in sheltered deep rich woods, often in ravines and river valleys.

Known hazards of Magnolia macrophylla:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.