Herb: Greek Mustard


Latin name: Hirschfeldia incana


Synonyms: Brassica adpressa, Sinapis incana


Family: Cruciferae



Edible parts of Greek Mustard:

The young plant is eaten with oil and lemon juice in parts of Greece. The leaves of young plants are eaten raw. Seeds - raw or cooked. They can be ground into powder then mixed with water and eaten.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Annual


Height:
100 cm
(3 1/4 foot)

Flovering:
June to
September

Habitat of the herb:

Naturalized in sandy places in the Channel Islands, it is also a casual in southern England.

Propagation of Greek Mustard:

Seed - sow spring in situ.

Cultivation of the herb:

Naturalized in sandy places in the Channel Islands, it is also a casual in southern England.

Medicinal use of Greek Mustard:

None known

Known hazards of Hirschfeldia incana:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.