Herb: Great Valley Gumweed


Latin name: Grindelia robusta


Family: Compositae



Medicinal use of Great Valley Gumweed:

The leaves and flowering tops are antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, balsamic, demulcent, expectorant, sedative, stomachic and a vascular tonic. Blood purifier. The plant is applied externally as a compress on inflamed or irritated areas of the skin. Used internally, it slows down the heartbeat and reduces the stimulation of the nerve endings in the air passages that causes coughing - it is therefore extremely effective as a calming agent in the treatment of asthma. The fluid extract is prepared by placing the freshly gathered leaves and flowers in a small quantity of simmering water for about 15 minutes. The plant is used to treat people affected by poison-ivy.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
60 cm
(2 feet)

Flovering:
May to
September

Habitat of the herb:

By the coast in sunny well-drained situations. Thrives in dry areas and salty plains.

Edible parts of Great Valley Gumweed:

Leaves - raw.

Other uses of the herb:

Yellow and green dyes are obtained from the flowering heads and pods. Aromatic. A decoction of the roots has been used as a hair shampoo to kill lice.

Propagation of Great Valley Gumweed:

Seed - sow autumn or spring in a cool greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Prick out the plants into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer.

Cultivation of the herb:

By the coast in sunny well-drained situations. Thrives in dry areas and salty plains.

Known hazards of Grindelia robusta:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.