Herb: Buckwheat


Latin name: Fagopyrum esculentum


Synonyms: Fagopyrum sagittatum, Fagopyrum vulgare, Polygonum fagopyrum


Family: Polygonaceae (Buckwheat Family)



Medicinal use of Buckwheat:

Buckwheat is a bitter but pleasant tasting herb that is frequently used medicinally because the leaves are a good source of rutin. Rutin is useful in the treatment of a wide range of circulatory problems, it dilates the blood vessels, reduces capillary permeability and lowers blood pressure. The leaves and shoots of flowering plants are acrid, astringent and vasodilator. It is used internally in the treatment of high blood pressure, gout, varicose veins, chilblains, radiation damage etc. It is best used in conjunction with vitamin C since this aids absorption. Often combined with lime flowers (Tilia species), it is a specific treatment for haemorrhage into the retina. The leaves and flowering stems are harvested as the plant begins to flower and are dried for later use. They should be stored in the dark because the active ingredients rapidly degrade in the light. Some caution should be exercised in the use of this herb because it has been known to cause light-sensitive dermatitis. A poultice made from the seeds has been used for restoring the flow of milk in nursing mothers. An infusion of the herb has been used in the treatment of erysipelas (an acute infectious skin disease). A homeopathic remedy has been made from the leaves. It is used in the treatment of eczema and liver disorders.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Annual


Height:
150 cm
(5 feet)

Flovering:
July to
September


Scent:
Scented
Annual

Habitat of the herb:

Waste ground as an escape from cultivation. Its original habitat is obscure.

Edible parts of Buckwheat:

Leaves - raw or cooked like spinach. Not that wonderful raw, they improve somewhat with cooking. The leaves are rich in rutin (see below for more details) and so are a very healthy addition to the diet. Seed - raw or cooked. A nutty flavour, though it has a somewhat gritty texture. The seed can be soaked overnight in warm water then sprouted for a few days and added to salads. It can also be ground into a powder and used as a cereal when it can be made into pancakes, noodles, breads etc or be used as a thickening agent in soups etc. Rich in vitamin B6. An excellent beer can be brewed from the grain.

Other uses of the herb:

A very good green manure plant, it can be used to reclaim badly degraded soils and subsoils. A blue dye is obtained from the stems. A brown dye is obtained from the flowers.

Propagation of Buckwheat:

Seed - sow from the middle of spring to early summer in situ. The seed usually germinates in 5 days. The earlier sowings are for a seed or leaf crop whilst the later sowings are used mainly for leaf crops or green manure.

Cultivation of the herb:

Waste ground as an escape from cultivation. Its original habitat is obscure.

Known hazards of Fagopyrum esculentum:

This plant has caused photosensitivity in some people, only the dehusked grain is considered to be safe.

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.