Herb: White Prairie Clover


Latin name: Dalea candida oligophylla


Synonyms: Petalostemon oligophyllum


Family: Leguminosae



Medicinal use of White Prairie Clover:

The plant is a strong emetic. A poultice of the plant has been used to treat wounds.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
70 cm
(2 feet)

Flovering:
July to
August

Habitat of the herb:

Dry desert and alluvial soils to 2000 metres. Prairies and open wods on sandy, clayey and rocky soils.

Edible parts of White Prairie Clover:

Root - raw or chewed for its pleasant sweet flavour. The root can be dried, ground into a powder and stored for later use. Leaves - cooked. The peeled stems have been used as a food. A tea-like beverage is made from the dried leaves.

Other uses of the herb:

An infusion of the roots has been used as a hair wash to prevent the hair from falling out. The plant has been used for making light brooms.

Propagation of White Prairie Clover:

Seed - pre-soak for 12 hours in warm water and sow in early spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer.

Cultivation of the herb:

Dry desert and alluvial soils to 2000 metres. Prairies and open wods on sandy, clayey and rocky soils.

Known hazards of Dalea candida oligophylla:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.