Herb: Japanese Chinquapin


Latin name: Castanopsis cuspidata


Synonyms: Quercus cuspidata


Family: Fagaceae (Beech Family)



Edible parts of Japanese Chinquapin:

Seed - cooked. The cotyledon of the nut is eaten boiled or roasted.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Evergreen
Tree

Height:
25 m
(82 feet)

Scent:
Scented
Tree

Habitat of the herb:

Woods and ravines, especially near the sea in western China.

Propagation of Japanese Chinquapin:

Seed - requires a period of cold stratification and is best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed has a short viability and should not be allowed to dry out. It can be stored for a few months if kept cool and moist (putting it in a plastic bag that is placed in the salad compartment of a fridge works well). Stored seed should be soaked in warm water for 24 - 48 hours prior to sowing. Germination usually takes place within 1 - 3 months at 15C. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick out the seedlings into individual pots and plant them out in mid summer if possible, otherwise grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring. Give the young plants some protection from cold for their first few winters outdoors.

Cultivation of the herb:

Woods and ravines, especially near the sea in western China.

Medicinal use of Japanese Chinquapin:

None known

Known hazards of Castanopsis cuspidata:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.