Creeping Bellflower - Campanula rapunculoides Creeping Bellflower - Campanula rapunculoides
Foto: botanika.wendys.cz

Herb: Creeping Bellflower


Latin name: Campanula rapunculoides


Family: Campanulaceae (Bellflower Family)



Medicinal use of Creeping Bellflower:

The plant has been used as a cure for hydrophobia in Russia.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
120 cm
(4 feet)

Flovering:
July to
September

Habitat of the herb:

Fields and woods. Naturalised in Britain where it grows in fields and more or less disturbed grassy areas such as railway banks, occasionally in woods, usually near to houses.

Edible parts of Creeping Bellflower:

Leaves and young shoots - raw or cooked. Rich in vitamin C. A pleasant mild flavour. Root - raw or cooked. A nut-like flavour, very palatable. The young roots are best. Somewhat sweet, they are a pleasant addition to the salad bowl.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - surface sow spring in a cold frame. The seed usually germinates in 2 - 4 weeks at 18C. Easy. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Basal cuttings in spring. Harvest the shoots when they are about 10 - 15cm long with plenty of underground stem. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Very easy, any part of the root will produce a new plant.

Cultivation of Creeping Bellflower:

Fields and woods. Naturalised in Britain where it grows in fields and more or less disturbed grassy areas such as railway banks, occasionally in woods, usually near to houses.

Known hazards of Campanula rapunculoides:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.