Herb: Korean Mint


Latin name: Agastache rugosa


Synonyms: Lophanthus rugosus


Family: Labiatae



Medicinal use of Korean Mint:

Korean mint is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs. Considered to be a "warming" herb, it is used in situations where there is "dampness" within the digestive system, resulting in poor digestion and reduced vitality. The leaves and stems are antibacterial, antifungal, aromatic, carminative, diaphoretic, febrifuge and stomachic. They are used internally to improve the appetite and strengthen the digestive system, they relieve symptoms such as abdominal bloating, indigestion, nausea and vomiting. They are also used to treat morning sickness. The leaves are also used in the treatment of chest congestion, diarrhoea and headaches. An infusion of the leaves is used in the treatment of angina pains. The plant is used as a folk remedy for cancer, extracts of the plant have shown anticancer activity.

Description of the plant:



Plant:
Perennial


Height:
100 cm
(3 1/4 foot)

Flovering:
July to
September

Habitat of the herb:

Grassy places in mountains, especially by streams, and in valleys all over Japan. Sunny, more or less stony meadows from the lowlands to elevations of 1500 metres.

Edible parts of Korean Mint:

Young leaves - raw or cooked. A strong anise-like fragrance, they are normally used as a flavouring or as an addition to the salad bowl. We find them a bit coarse and too strong for use as a salad. The leaves can be used as a tea substitute. A pleasant flavour. The seed is possibly edible. No further details. The seed certainly should not be poisonous, but it is very small and its use would be very fiddly.

Propagation of the herb:

Seed - sow spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 3 months at 13C. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first year. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring. Fairly simple, if large divisions are used it is possible to plant them straight out into their permanent positions. Basal cuttings of young shoots in spring. Harvest the young shoots when they are about 10 - 15cm tall and pot them up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse. They should root within 3 weeks and can be planted out in the summer or following spring.

Cultivation of Korean Mint:

Grassy places in mountains, especially by streams, and in valleys all over Japan. Sunny, more or less stony meadows from the lowlands to elevations of 1500 metres.

Known hazards of Agastache rugosa:

None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future.